One man tops the list of people responsible for the success of the University of Nebraska athletic teamsĖBob Devaney. For 35 years he was the driving force behind the University of Nebraska championships, first as a Hall of Fame football coach (1962-72), then as Athletic Director (1967-93) and Athletic Director Emeritus (1993-96).

    Devaney retired in 1996 and lived in Lincoln until he passed away at the age of 82 on May 9, 1997.

    Although Devaney no longer has a physical presence at Nebraska, his mark will remain forever. The memories of the storybook national championship seasons of 1970 and 1971 will inspire generations of Husker fans for years to come. His commitment to building one of the nation’s best all-around athletic programs is reinforced with every athletic and academic honor earned by Husker student-athletes. And his legacy continues with the passing of each successful season.

    From the time he took over athletic director duties for Tippy Dye in 1967, to his final year as athletic director in 1993, his vigor, enthusiasm and administrative excellence earned him a reputation as one of the nation’s outstanding athletic directors. Those same characteristics helped make him a football coaching legend. A 1981 inductee into the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame, under Devaney’s leadership Nebraska developed one of the nation’s most successful all-around athletic programs.

    Devaney arrived in Lincoln in 1962, after posting a 35-10-5 (.750) five-year record at Wyoming. During his 11-year stint as Husker football coach, Devaney’s teams won 101 games, lost only 20 and tied two for an .829 winning percentage. His career mark of 136-30-7 (.806) ranked him as the nation’s winningest active coach at the time of his retirement in 1973, and he ranks 11th on the all-time list today, six spots behind the man he tabbed as his replacement, Tom Osborne. He is the only coach in NCAA Division-1A history win five consecutive AFCA Regional Coach-of-the-Year awards.

    In all, his Husker gridiron teams won eight Big Eight titles and two national championships (1970, 1971) and went to nine bowl games. He wound up with three straight Orange Bowl wins, two Outland Trophy winners, a Lombardi Award winner and a Heisman Trophy winner. Twice his teams won four consecutive Big Eight titles, 1963-66 and 1969-72.

    Bob Devaney Record

    Year

    Won

    Lost

    Tied

    Pct.

    Bowl

    Highlights

    At Wyoming

    1957

    4

    3

    3

    .550

    1958

    8

    3

    0

    .727

    Sun

    Skyline Conf. Champs

    1959

    9

    1

    0

    .900

    Skyline Conf. Champs

    1960

    8

    2

    0

    .800

    Skyline Conf. Champs

    1961

    6

    1

    2

    .778

    Skyline Conf. Champs

    Totals

    35

    10

    5

    .750

    Four league titles

    At Nebraska

    1962

    9

    2

    0

    .818

    Gotham

    1963

    10

    1

    0

    .909

    Orange

    Big Eight Champions

    1964

    9

    2

    0

    .818

    Cotton

    Big Eight Champions

    1965

    10

    1

    0

    .909

    Orange

    Big Eight Champions

    1966

    9

    2

    0

    .818

    Sugar

    Big Eight Champions

    1967

    6

    4

    0

    .600

    1968

    6

    4

    0

    .600

    1969

    9

    2

    0

    .818

    Sun

    Big Eight co-Champions

    1970

    11

    0

    1

    .958

    Orange

    National Champions

    1971

    13

    0

    0

    1.000

    Orange

    National Champions

    1972

    9

    2

    1

    .792

    Orange

    Big Eight Champions

    Totals

    101

    20

    2

    .829

    Eight league titles

    Overall Total

    136

    30

    7

    .806

    12 league titles

    Bowl Record

    7

    3

    0

    .700

    Two national titles

    Bob Devaney's Honors and Accomplishments

    • University of Nebraska Head Coach (1962-72)
    • University of Nebraska Director of Athletics (1967-93)
    • Two National Titles (1970-71)
    • 1981 College Football Hall of Fame Inductee
    • Only Division-IA Coach in History to Win Five Consecutive AFCA Regional Coach-of-the-Year Awards