Ryan

Anderson

RyanAndersonZoom

#44

Guard
Height: 6'4"
Weight: 205
Year: Senior
City/State: Seattle, Wash.
High School: Rainier Beach

Bio

Honors
►2010 Big 12 All-Underrated (media)
►2009 Big 12 All-Defense (media)
►2007 Fall Big 12 Commissioner's Honor Roll
►Nebraska all-time top 25 for scoring, rebounding and assists
►Nebraska all-time top 10 for 3-pointers, 3-point percentage, steals, games played and games started

2009-10 (Senior)
Ryan Anderson etched his name throughout the Nebraska record books during his senior season when he was the team leader in scoring, rebounds, 3-pointers and steals. Anderson averaged a career-best 11.3 points to go with 5.3 rebounds and added 1.7 steals per game to rank fourth in the Big 12 Conference. For his efforts, Anderson, who played all four years as an undersized '4' man, was named to the Big 12 All-Underrated Team by league's sportswriters.

During the season, Anderson crossed the plateaus of 1,000 points, 500 rebounds and 150 3-pointers, becoming the first Husker in the Big 12 era (and only third Husker ever) and just the eighth league player since the formation of the Big 12 to reach all of those plateaus. Anderson joined Nebraska Hall of Famer Erick Strickland as the only two players in school history with 1,000 points, 500 rebounds, 150 3-pointers, 150 assists and 150 steals.

Anderson finished his career ranked third all-time with 185 3-pointers and fifth with 166 steals. He was also in the top 25 all-time for 3-point percentage (8th), scoring (23rd), rebounds (16th), assists (17th), games played (11th) and games started (5th).

After a slow start to the season, Anderson picked up the pace in conference play, especially over the final seven games of his career when he averaged 15.1 ppg and 7.0 rpg, including tying his season high twice with 22 points against Missouri and Kansas State.

Anderson added a career-high 14 rebounds to go with 16 points against Oregon State and added one other double-double on the year (fourth career) with 10 points and 13 rebounds against Colorado on Senior Night. He scored in double figures in 19 games, leading the team in scoring 19 times. He posted a career-best six steals in the season opener and had at least four steals in six games.

Down the stretch, Anderson hit 22 of his last 37 attempts (59.4 percent) from 3-point range while leading the league in long-range accuracy by hitting 42.9 percent on the season, including a league high of 48.6 percent in conference-only games.

2008-09 (Junior)
Anderson provided a key leadership role for a Cornhusker squad that won 18 games and reached its second straight postseason berth. Among the victories were eight wins in the Big 12 Conference, giving the Huskers their first .500 record in league play in 10 years.

Anderson's guidance also helped the Huskers remain one of the top defensive teams in the country. Nebraska ranked 22nd nationally and first in the rugged Big 12 in scoring defense by allowing just 60.4 points per game on the season. Despite coming off the bench in all but two league games, Anderson was named to the 2009 Big 12 All-Defensive Team by the league's sportswriters.

On the year, Anderson averaged 7.1 points and 3.8 rebounds per game while hitting 40.2 percent from the floor, including 34.0 percent from long range. Anderson, who despite standing 6-4 has played in the 4 spot each of his three years at Nebraska, showed his versatility as he was second on the team in 3-pointers (33), third in steals (41) and fifth in assists (57). He improved his assist-to-turnover ratio for the third straight season, setting a personal best at 1.8 (57 assists, 31 turnovers).

Anderson's versatility helped him join elite company during his junior campaign. During the season, Anderson became just the seventh player in Husker history to record 100 3-pointers, 100 assists and 100 steals in a career, joining Eric Piatkowski, Tyronn Lue, Erick Strickland, Cookie Belcher, Cary Cochran and Jaron Boone.

After struggling early in the season, Anderson showed his commitment to coach Doc Sadler's team approach as he came off the bench 17 times in the final 19 games. The end result was that he saw his numbers rise while helping the Huskers finish one game out of fourth place in the Big 12 standings.

Over the final eight games of the regular season, Anderson's numbers were outstanding as he hit 51.0 percent from the floor including a scorching 48.3 percent from beyond the arc while ranking second on the squad in scoring. During that span he hit 26-of-51 attempts from the field, with 14 3-pointers on 29 tries.

Anderson scored at least nine points in four of those contests, a total he reached only four times in his first 20 games of the year. He had a season-high tying 19 points on 7-of-9 shooting including two 3-pointers at Kansas State and added 11 points against Iowa State and 10 points at Kansas.

At nationally ranked Oklahoma earlier in the season, Anderson poured in 19 points with a season-high four 3-pointers while adding seven rebounds and two assists in the Huskers' narrow defeat. In five games ranked teams, Anderson posted 9.6 points per contest while hitting 11 3-pointers.

Following the narrow loss to OU, Anderson rebounded with 14 points, eight boards and four steals against Oklahoma State. It was one of 11 games on the season he produced at least five rebounds, with his season high coming in a victory over Elite Eight opponent Missouri. In the victory over the Tigers, he had 10 boards and eight points. 

2007-08 (Sophomore)
Anderson became an integral part of the Husker lineup as a sophomore when he was one of only two players to start all 33 contests. Anderson, who started at the 4 spot for the second straight season despite standing just 6-4, scored 8.4 points per game and hit 42.2 percent from the field. He became a more well-rounded player as his averages for rebounds (5.6 rpg), assists (1.7 apg) and steals (1.4 spg) all increased significantly over his rookie year.

Using his basketball savvy to navigate the paint on defense, Anderson ranked 18th in rebounding in the Big 12 Conference. In league-only games, Anderson also ranked 18th with 5.4 boards per game, while also ranking fourth in steals (1.75 spg) and 13th in 3-pointers per game (1.69).

Anderson scored a season-high 21 points with nine rebounds and four steals in a victory over nationally ranked Oregon and added 14 points with five rebounds, four assists and three steals in a four-point loss at nationally ranked Texas. He scored double figures 14 times, including 19 points on 8-of-9 shooting against Texas Tech.

Anderson showed his versatility by posting his first two career double-doubles, both against Missouri. He helped NU to its first league win with a road victory over the Tigers as he had 11 points and 10 rebounds, before coming with back 15 points and 11 rebounds in the rematch in Lincoln. Anderson finished the year with seven rebounds in 11 games, three or more assists in nine games and at least two steals in 14 games.

A threat from nearly anywhere on the court, Anderson's 3-point shooting made him a difficult matchup. He hit a team-best 50 treys to become the only player in NU history to hit at least 48 3-pointers in each of his first two years. With 98 treys in two seasons, he owns the second-highest total by a sophomore in school history, trailing only Cary Cochran, who had 101 treys in his first two seasons.

In the classroom, Anderson earned Big 12 Commissioner's Fall Honor Roll accolades. 

2006-07 (Freshman)
Anderson made an immediate impact for the Huskers as a freshman. Despite playing out of position in the 4 spot, Anderson racked up solid numbers as he was second on the team with 10.1 points and 4.6 rebounds per game.

Anderson's scoring average and 283 total points ranked sixth and ninth, respectively, in the NU freshman record book. In fact, he was only the sixth freshman in NU history to average double-figure points. In a well-rounded rookie campaign, Anderson also ranked in the NU freshman top 10 for field goals (103, eighth), rebounds (129, seventh), 3-pointers (48, second) and steals (25, eighth). 

Anderson became an integral part of the Husker lineup as a sophomore when he was one of only two players to start all 33 contests. Anderson, who started at the 4 spot for the second straight season despite standing just 6-4, scored 8.4 points per game and hit 42.2 percent from the field. He became a more well-rounded player as his averages for rebounds (5.6 rpg), assists (1.7 apg) and steals (1.4 spg) all increased significantly over his rookie year.

Anderson became an integral part of the Husker lineup as a sophomore when he was one of only two players to start all 33 contests. Anderson, who started at the 4 spot for the second straight season despite standing just 6-4, scored 8.4 points per game and hit 42.2 percent from the field. He became a more well-rounded player as his averages for rebounds (5.6 rpg), assists (1.7 apg) and steals (1.4 spg) all increased significantly over his rookie year.

Ranking second on the team, Anderson hit an impressive 47.0 percent from the floor on the year. While he had relatively few attempts, Anderson was just as solid from the charity stripe as he hit 74.4 percent (29-of-39).

Despite being slowed by an ankle injury during the start of the conference season, Anderson was still one of the most deadly 3-point shooters in Nebraska history. He finished the season leading the Huskers with 48 3-pointers while his 43.2 percent shooting from outside the arc was second on the team and seventh in Nebraska history.

In his most prolific game of the year, Anderson posted 29 points in a road loss to Hawaii at the Rainbow Classic. Anderson, who just missed tying the NU freshman single-game scoring record of 30 points set by Tyronn Lue in 1997, drained a career-best seven 3-pointers in the contest to tie the Husker freshman record while finishing one away from the overall mark. He also made six treys at Kansas and set a single-game school accuracy record by going 5-for-5 from beyond the arc at Rutgers.

Anderson just missed out on 20-point contests three other times, including a 19-point performance when he hit 7-of-8 attempts from the floor to help Nebraska to a 73-61 victory over No. 20 Creighton. Anderson's biggest games seemed to come against the top competition as he averaged a team-best 15.8 points and 4.8 rebounds, including hitting 55.0 percent from the floor, in five games against ranked teams.

After struggling with turnovers that left him with a 22-to-36 deficit in assist-to-turnover ratio during the non-conference slate, Anderson made solid gains during league play by posting 24 assists against just 20 turnovers. He averaged 2.0 assists per game over his last 11 contests. 

Before Nebraska
Anderson, who was a highly rated West Coast recruit and was considered one of the top long-range shooters in the West, lettered four years at powerhouse Rainier Beach High School. Among the team's accolades with Anderson on the squad was a state title and No. 1 ranking in the nation during his freshman year. That team included future NBA guards Jamal Crawford and Nate Robinson.

Anderson helped Rainier Beach to a runner-up finish at state as a sophomore. He earned all-conference and all-city honors as a junior and senior, and added first-team all-state accolades as a senior when he averaged 19.4 points, nine rebounds and seven assists per game as the team placed fourth at state with a 23-7 record.

Anderson was ranked among the top 20 players in the western United States by Hoop Review and was named the MVP of the 2006 Northwest Shootout all-star game. He dominated the high school all-star event by scoring 39 points with 10 rebounds.

During summer AAU action, Anderson averaged 12 points, four rebounds and three assists per game while helping his Friends of Hoop squad to the semifinal of the 2005 Nike Peach Jam. Later that summer, Anderson and Friends of Hoop won the Main Event title in Las Vegas and reached the Prep Showcase championship game. At the Prep Showcase, Anderson won the 3-point contest title, defeating Kevin Durant in the finals.

Personal
The son of Carla and Paul Anderson, Ryan was born Dec. 19, 1987. He has four sisters, Taylor, Erin, Deborah and Kela, and a brother, Austin. Ryan is majoring in sociology at Nebraska.

Ryan was married to the former Danielle Smith on Aug. 8, 2009, in his hometown of Seattle.

Anderson is a tremendous musician in his spare time, as he sings and also plays six musical instruments (drums, bass, guitar, sax, piano and keyboards). He has completed work for his first CD, on which he wrote and composed every song.

View Full Bio
MBB 2010 Senior Video
Doc Sadler talks about Senior Ryan Anderson (Mar. 1st, 2010)
MBB N Side the Locker Room with Ryan Anderson (Feb. 7th, 2010)