Memorial Stadium

The home of the Huskers since 1923 and the location of a continuing NCAA-record consecutive sellout streak, Memorial Stadium provides one of the most exciting game-day experiences in all of college football.


One of the “Cathedrals of College Football,” according to The Sporting News, Memorial Stadium is one of the most intimidating locations to play in all of sports.

With expanded capacity now reaching beyond 85,000, Nebraska has continued its NCAA-record streak of consecutive sellouts that dates back to 1962 and is at 333 games entering the 2014 season. Nebraska celebrated its 300th consecutive sellout with a stadium record crowd against Louisiana-Lafayette in 2009.

While maintaining its traditional charm, Memorial Stadium has also become one of the most high-tech stadiums in the country. In 1994, the stadium was the first on-campus stadium to feature big-screen instant replay boards. Several upgrades have been made in the past two decades, keeping the Memorial Stadium game experience as one of the nation’s best.

Inscribed on the four corners of the stadium are the following words, written by former UNL professor of philosophy Hartley Burr Alexander:

Southeast: "In Commemoration of the men of Nebraska who served and fell in the Nations Wars."
Southwest: "Not the victory but the action; Not the goal but the game; In the deed the glory."
Northwest: "Courage; Generosity; Fairness; Honor; In these are the true awards of manly sport."
Northeast: "Their Lives they held their countrys trust; They kept its faith; They died its heroes."

Game Day at Nebraska

When you walk in here, you see nothing but red. I can't recall walking into another stadium and seeing such an amazing, monochromatic scene and so much loyalty. When they're stirred up when Nebraska is challenged - that's when this crowd can become on of the most intimidating in college football. - Chris Fowler


Game days at Nebraska are unlike any in college football. Fans line the streets of Lincoln waiting to enter the “Sea of Red,” while the marching band parades up Stadium Drive as thousands of red-clad fans look on. The “Third-Largest City” in Nebraska on game days, Memorial Stadium has been sold out for every game since 1962—an incredible streak of more than 300 games and counting.

The Huskers emerge from the famous “Tunnel Walk” to the sound of “Sirius” and the fans stay at a frenzied pitch until the final play of the game when they graciously cheer for the opposing players as they exit the field.

For as long as anyone can remember, the Huskers have touched a lucky horseshoe on their way from the locker room to the field. The horseshoe hangs above the door as Nebraska leaves the North Stadium.

The Tunnel Walk, which began in 1994, has become an integral part of Memorial Stadium’s game-day experience. It was created as a way for fans to share in the excitement of the team emerging from the locker room, something only a few could do before HuskerVision’s cameras and big screens came to Memorial Stadium. The sounds of the Alan Parsons Project’s “Sirius,” and the roar of the 85,000 frenzied fans rock the stadium as the Huskers burst through the locker room doors and into the tunnel on their way to the Memorial Stadium Field Turf.

East Stadium Expansion


In April of 2011 the University of Nebraska began construction expanding the East Stadium of Memorial Stadium. When construction is complete in 2013 East Stadium will be roughly twice as tall as it originally was, accommodate more than 6,000 extra fans with 38 additional suites, and house the Nebraska Athletic Performance Lab.

Under the direction of Judith M. Burnfield, PhD, PT the Nebraska Athletic Performance Lab will allow researchers space to conduct advanced research on everything from the biomechanics of elite athletes to athletic and nutrition supplements to biomarkers that measure saliva and recovery time to cardiovascular research to athletic equipment issues such as helmet and footwear design. This research will allow for innovative solutions that will benefit athletes in terms of their safety and athletic performance which will also scale to the benefit of the general public.